Fellows

Fellows in the ShowMe Nature GK-12 program are selected from PhD candidates in the Interdisciplinary Plant Group, Conservation Biology, and Life Sciences at the University of Missouri. The program pairs fellows who differ in their research focus, teaming students working on genetic, developmental and biochemical mechanisms at the cellular and sub cellular level with peers whose research addresses ecological or evolutionary processes in populations, communities and landscapes. Each partner school hosts one pair of fellows. One fellow serves fourth grade classrooms and one serves fifth grade classrooms. Fellows work alongside classroom teachers as science ambassadors to bring research and inquiry into the daily lives of their students.

k-alam Khalid Alam, a doctoral student in biochemistry, is working to develop a novel diagnostic device for the detection of drug interactions in resource poor settings. As a new parent, Khalid is more determined than ever to teach children the interdisciplinary nature of applied science and to seek solutions building on existing knowledge. In his own words, Khalid sought out the opportunity to “foster curiosity and teach the scientific process to the next generation of students.” Years: 2012-2103
r-albert Rachel Albert is a graduate student in the Anthropology program. Rachel studies the evolution of human behavior and compares how males and females of different primates use tools. Rachel sought out the opportunity to be involved in ShowMe Nature GK-12 because of her “love for helping students discover the wonders of the natural world and encouraging their curiosity.” Years: 2013-2015
m-burfield Michael Burfield, a graduate student in Fisheries and Wildlife, is studying how campus landscape planning affects people who work and study at the university. He is excited about getting young students to think about the amazing world that surrounds them, even in their own neighborhoods. Years: 2013-2015
c-coffmann Clayton Coffman, a graduate student in Plant Biology and Genetics Program at MU. Clayton is studying how plants defend themselves against hungray caterpillars for his PhD research project. In his own words Clayton sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because he “has a huge interest in exposing K-12 students to scientific research” and “hopes that his knowledge can contribute to teaching scientific ideas more effectively.” Years: 2011-2012, 2012-2013
j-dale Jeff Dale, a graduate student in Biological Sciences at MU. Jeff is studying diseases of the spinal cord using mice as a model system for his PhD research project. In his own words Jeff sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom in order to “acquire vital teaching experience”. Years: 2011-2012
l-decker Logan Decker, a graduate student in Biological Sciences at MU. For his PhD research project Logan is using fungi to study how mistakes in an organism’s genetic code disrupt vital functions. In his own words Logan sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because “sometimes the subject matter of science can be hard to teach and even harder to learn”. His hope is that he can find a way to make the individual lessons fun and interactive. Years: 2011-2012
IMGP2063  James Franklin is a Masters student working with Dr. Candace Galen in Biological Sciences. His research focus is on disruption of plant-pollinator relationships under global change. Using GIS modeling and archival data sets, he is reconstructing shifts in flowering time of bumblebee food resources over the past 40 years for Rocky Mountain ecosystems. James plans a career in Conservation, a field where his growth as a GK-12 Fellow will serve him well in sharing his passion for nature with the public. Years: 2012-2013, 2013-2014
h-gibb Heather Gibb is a graduate student in Anthropology studying how animals and humans interacted in the past. She uses GIS technology and animal collections to compare environments of modern and prehistoric animal populations. Heather is excited for the opportunity to teach young people since she realized at a similar age that there was a world out there that she could understand using science.” Years: 2013-2015
 j-gibson Jeremy Gibson, a graduate student in Biological Sciences at MU. Jeremy is studying how insects communicate for his PhD research project. In his own words Jeremy sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because of his “love for sharing science with children” and for “sharing ‘our’ world with the community”. Years: 2011-2012
l-hibbert Lianne Hibbert, a graduate student in the Fisheries and Wildlife Program at MU. Lianne is studying the relationship between humans and the natural environment for her PhD research project. In her own words Lianne sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because she hopes to create “education and outreach programs that are culturally relevant, stir up a fascination for science, and increase knowledge about the environment in a practical and fun way”. Years: 2011-2012
c-king Chad King, a graduate student in the Forestry Program at MU. Chad is studying the history of fire in the Missouri Ozarks for his PhD research project. In his own words Chad sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because he is “hoping to introduce students to the secrets of trees and providing the students with opportunities to study trees.” Years: 2011-2012
d-leuchtman Dan Leucthman is a graduate student in the Department of Biological Sciences. I am studying how light signals and the immune system communicate in plants. The quote I guess I would use from my letter to teachers is, ” I am hoping to help students understand that the biological processes taking place within every cell have huge effects on the biology of an entire organism.” Years: 2012-2013
j-merricks Jessica Merricks is a graduate student in Biological Sciences at MU. She studies acoustic communication in treefrogs, including how male and female treefrogs communicate for the purpose of mating. Jessica has a passion for communicating her love of science to audiences of all ages, and is most looking forward to sharing her love of nature and discovery with children. Years: 2012-2013
j-morrand Jonathan Morrand, a graduate student in Biochemistry at MU. Jonathan is studying both how to use bacteria, plant cells, and mammalian cells to produce proteins for third world health research and gene expression in plants for his PhD research project. In his own words, Jonathan sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because he “wants to ignite interest in science as early in students’ lives as possible” and “to share the fascinating world of cells and genetics with the students”. Years: 2012-2013, 2013-2014
b-naylor Brett Naylor is a graduate student in Plant Sciences identifying ways to make soybeans more tolerant to drought so they are productive even in dry years. Brett hopes to learn more about science teaching in order to foster “a rewarding science learning environment” for his students. Years: 2013-2015
s-schuttler Stephanie Schuttler, a graduate student in Biology Program at MU. Stephanie is studying migration and herd composition in African forest elephants for her PhD research project. In her own words Stephanie sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because she “would like to learn how to inspire and educate people about the natural world” and “to develop creative ways to engage a classroom in scientific learning”. Years: 2011-2012, 2012-2013
a-tipton Alice Tipton, a graduate student in the Biology Program at MU. Alice is studying plant fungal relationships called mycorrhizae and their role in native habitat restorations of dolomite glades for her PhD research project. A quote about why I sought out this opportunity: “I believe that education is foundational to a bright future. I hope to learn how to effectively share my passion for science and nature with students, like great teachers once did with me.” Years: 2012-2015
a-warren Amy Warren is a graduate student in Anthropology who is studying how and why diseases spread through prehistoric human populations. Amy is “thrilled to be part of a program that allows young students to conduct real scientific research, because this will … encourage them to become science innovators of the future.” Years: 2013-2015
s-zukoff Sarah Zukoff, a graduate student in Plant Sciences at MU. Sarah is studying the ecology of the western corn rootworm for her PhD research project. In her own words Sarah sought out this opportunity to work in the classroom because she hopes to share her “knowledge and love of science with the students while giving them a chance to learn something new and exciting.” Years: 2011-2012